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INSTRUCTION

 

FOR TARGET-FIRING.

 

Practice in firing at a target being an essential part of infantry instruction, commanders of regiments and detached companies will exert themselves to render their officers and sergeants familiar with its theory.

In respect to theory, detailed instructions may be expected from the War Department.

Recruits will be exercised in target firing as soon as they shall have passed through the School of the Soldier.

In the beginning of this exercise, each man will be made to fire several rounds in succession, the instructer carefully rectifying the position of the body, and the piece, at each fire.

The second distance will not be taken till the men have learnt to fire with some accuracy at the first, and the same of the third, in respect to the second distance.

The corporals and men of the each company will be divided into three classes: the first class will consist of the most accurate

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SERGEANT'S MANUAL

 

marksmen; the second, the next in accuracy, and the third the most indifferent. 

Commanders will employ all the means in their power to excite the desire of excellence in firing at the target; they will keep an exact register of the best shots, and note also the officers and sergeants who exhibit the most zeal and intelligence in this important branch of instruction.

At regimental head quarters, a field officer, when practicable, and if not, a captain, will always be present at these exercises, in order to stimulate zeal, and to cause a strict compliance with the theoretic principles which may be prescribed by the Department of War.

To preserve the habits of firing, the corporals and men will never discharge at a target, the same day, more than three to five rounds each; and. instead of expending in a single season the ammunition that may be authorized for the purpose, the exercise will be intermitted, and resumed at intervals of three or four weeks, throughout the year.

Ammunition allowed for target-firing will be unequally divided among the three classes of marksmen, and the largest portion set apart for the third class, and the smallest for the first.

 

 

MANUAL OF ARMS.

 

FOR SERGEANTS.

 

The sergeants, like the rank and file, will always

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SERGEANT'S MANUAL

 

present themselves under arms with the bayonets fixed.

All sergeants, including the sergeant major and the quartermaster sergeant, also corporals of the colour-guard, and all corporals not in the ranks and files, will carry, and handle their arms, as herein prescribed  for sergeants.

Sergeants, in the manual of arms, will observe in all the times (or pauses) the cadence prescribed, No, 159, and following, for the rank and file.  In the loadings and firings, they will remain at the shoulder, or support arms, according to the order which they may receive.

 

 Position of Shouldered Arms.

 

The piece within the right arm, the barrel to the rear, erect, and resting against the hollow of the shoulder; the right arm nearly straight, the right hand embracing the cock and guard, and the left arm hanging by the side. 


Present-ARMS.

 

One time and two motions.

 

(First motion.)  With the right hand bring the piece erect, opposite to the centre of the body, the rammer to the front; at the same time seize the piece with the left hand above the lock, the little finger against the feather-spring, the thumb extended along the barrel and on the stock, the fore-arm resting on the body, without

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SERGEANT'S MANUAL

 

constraint, and the hand at the height of the elbow.

(Second motion)  Correct the position of the right hand, so as to bring it under, and against the guard, as in the case of the men.

 

Shoulder-ARMS.

 

One time and two motions.

 

(First motion.)  Slip the left hand, on the piece, to the height of the shoulder, and with this hand, bring the piece against the right shoulder; embrace, with the right hand, the cock and guard, the right arm nearly straight. 

(Second motion,)  Drop the left hand smartly by the side.

 

Order-ARMS.

 

One time and wo motions.

 

(First motion.)  Bring the left hand promptly to the middle band; detach the piece a little from the shoulder with the right hand; quit the hold of the right hand; lower the piece with the left, seizing it again with the right above the lower band, the thumb on the barrel, the four fingers extended on the stock, the piece erect, the butt about three inches from the ground, the toe (or beak) of the butt over its place, and drop the left hand by the side.

(Second motion.)  Let the piece slip through the right hand, opening a little the thumb and fore-fingers, so

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SERGEANT'S MANUAL

 

that the butt may come to the ground without shock, its toe in a line with, and against the toe of the right foot.

 

Shoulder-ARMS.

 

One time and two motions.

 

(First motion)  With the right hand, raise the piece perpendicularly, the hand at the height of the right breast, opposite to the shoulder, but further out, and about two inches from the body, on which the right elbow will rest; seize the piece with the left hand under the right; drop the right hand, and with it, embrace the cock and guard, supporting the piece against the right shoulder, the right arm nearly straight.

(Second motion.)  Let the left hand fall smartly by the side.

 

Support-ARMS.

 

One time and three motions.

 

(First motion.)  With the right hand, bring the piece erect between the eyes, the rammer to the front; seize the piece with the left hand at the lower band, raise this hand to the height of the chin, and grasp the piece at the same time about four inches below the lock with the right hand.

(Second motion.)  With the right hand turn the piece, the barrel to the front, support it against the left shoulder, and bring the left fore-arm between the cock

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SERGEANT'S MANUAL
 

and right hand, horizontally across the body, the cock resting on the left fore-arm, and the left hand on the right breast. 

(Third motion.)  Drop smartly the right hand by the side.

 

Shoulder-ARMS.

 

One time and three motions.

 

(First motion.)  Seize the piece with the right hand, under and against the left fore-arm.

(Second motion.)  Bring the piece erect, with the right hand, against the right shoulder, the rammer to the front; seize it with the left hand, at the height of the shoulder; correct the position of the right hand at the same time so as to embrace the cock and guard, the right arm nearly straight.

(Third motion.)  Drop the left hand smartly by the side.

 

Unfix-BAYONET.

 

One time and three motions.

 

(First motion.)  Bring the left hand promptly to the middle band, detach a little the piece from the shoulder, with the right hand.

(Second motion.)  Lower the piece with the left hand, seize it with the right above the lower band; rest the butt on the ground, letting the piece slip through the

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CORPORAL'S MANUAL

 

left hand; bring the right hand immediately to the bayonet.

(Third motion.)  Wrest off the bayonet, and return it to the scabbard; next seize the piece with the right hand a little above the lower band; drop the left hand at the same time by the side, and take the position of the soldier at ordered arms.

 

Shoulder-ARMS.
 

As from ordered arms. 

 

Fix-BAYONET,

 

One time and three motions.

 

(First and second motions.)  As those of unfix bayonet, except that at the end of the second motion the right hand will be brought to seize the bayonet by the socket and shank, so that the socket may extend about an inch above the heel of the hand.

(Third motion.)  Draw the bayonet from the scabbard with the right hand, carry it and fix it on the muzzle; next seize the piece with the right hand above the lower band, and drop smartly the left hand by the side.

 

Shoulder-ARMS.

 

As from ordered arms. 

 

FOR CORPORALS.  To pass from the shoulder as privagte to the shoulder as sergeant.

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CORPORAL'S MANUAL

 

  As sergeant, Shoulder-ARMS.

 

One time and three motions.

 

(First motion.)  With the right hand, seize the piece at the handle, turn it, the lock to the front, the right arm nearly straight, the right hand embracing the cock and guard; seize the piece with the left hand at the height of the shoulder.

(Third motion.)  Drop the left hand smartly by the side.

 

FOR CORPORALS OF THE COLOUR-GUARD, (OR SERGEANTS.)

 

Charge-Bayonet.

 

One time and two motions.

 

(First motion.)  Raise the piece with the right hand, in half-facing to the right on the left heel, and bring the hollow of the right foot opposite to, and three inches from, the left heel.

(Second motion.)  Drop the piece forward into the left hand, which will seize it a little above the lower band, the barrel up, the left elbow supported against the body; with the right hand, seize the handle below the guard, this hand supported against the hip, the point of the bayonet at the height of the eye.

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CORPORAL'S MANUAL

 

Shoulder-ARMS.

 

One time and two motions.

 

(First motion.)  In facing to the front, raise the piece with the left hand, bring it erect against the right shoulder, the rammer to the front; with the right hand, at the same time, embrace the cock and guard.

(Second motion.)  Quit hold with the left hand, and drop this hand by the side; lengthen at the same time the right arm.

 

FOR CORPORALS RETURNING TO THE RANKS.

As soldier, Shoulder-ARMS.

One time and three motions.

(First motion.)  Detach the piece from the shoulder, bring it erect between the eyes, seize it with the left hand at the height of the neck; grasp with the right hand the handle, this hand at the height of the elbow, the rammer to the front. 

(Second motion.)  Raise the piece with the right hand, the thumb extended on the counterplate; turn the barrel to the front; support the piece against the left shoulder; at the same time drop the left hand, and place it under the butt.

(Third motion.)  Drop the right hand smartly by the side.

 

RELIEVING SENTINELS.

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FOR RELIEVING SENTINELS.

 

Arms-PORT

 

One time and one motion.

 

Throw the piece diagonally across the body, the lock to the front, seize it smartly at the same instant with both hands, the right at the handle, the left at the tail band, the two thumbs pointing towards the muzzle, the barrel sloping upwards and crossing opposite to the point of the left shoulder, the butt proportionally lowered.  The palm of the right hand will be above, and that of the left hand under the piece, the nails of both hands next to the body, to which the elbows will be closed.

 

Shoulder-ARMS.

 

One time and two motions.

 

(First motion.)  Bring the piece smartly to the left shoulder, placing the left hand under the butt.

(Second motion.)  Drop the right hand smartly by the side.

 

SWORD MANUAL, &C.

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MANUAL OF THE SWORD OR SABRE,

FOR OFFICERS.

 

POSITION OF THE SWORD OR SABRE, UNDER ARMS.

 

The carry.  The gripe in the right hand, which will be supported against the right hip, the back of the blade against the shoulder.

 

TO SALUTE WITH THE SWORD OR SABRE.

 

Three times (or pauses.)

 

One.  At the distance of six paces from the person to be saluted, raise the sword or sabre perpendicularly, the point up, the flat of the blade opposite to the right eye, the guard at the height of the shoulder, the elbow supported on the body.

Two.  Drop the point of the sword or sabre by extending the arm, so that the right hand may be brought to the side of the right thigh, and remain in that position until the person to whom the salute is rendered shall be passed, or shall have passed, six paces.

Three.  Raise the sword or sabre smartly, and resume the position first prescribed.

 

________

 

COLOUR-SALUTE.

 

In the ranks, the colour-bearer, whether at a halt or

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INSTRUCTION FOR THE DRUM MAJOR.

 

in march, will always carry the heel of the colour-lance supported at the right hip, the right hand generally placed on the lance at the height of the shoulder, to hold it steady.  When the colour has to render honours, the color-bearer will salute as follows:

At the distance of six paces slip the right hand along the lance to the height of the eye; lower the lance by straightening the arm to its full extent, the heel of the lance remaining at the hip, and bring back the lance to the habitual position when the person saluted shall be passed, or shall have passed, six paces.  See note to No. 52.

 

_____

INSTRUCTION

 

FOR THE DRUM-MAJOR (OR PRINCIPAL MUSICIAN.)

 

the posts of the field music and band have been given, Title I, for the order in battle.

In column in maneuvre, the field music and ban will march abreast with the left centre company, on the reverse flank, except as in No. 1464.

In column in route, as well as in the passage of defiles to the front or in retreat, they will march at the head of their respective battalions. 

 

Beats of the drum and sounds of the bugle.

 

The number of these, for infantry, independent of mere police calls, and the particular march of each regiment,

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INSTRUCTION FOR THE DRUM MAJOR

 

is fixed at nineteen beats and twenty-two sounds.  See the music at the end of this volume.

 

The beats are:

 

1.  The general.

2.  The assembly

3.  To the colour.

4.  The long roll.

5.  Common time.

6.  Quick time.

7.  The reveille.

8.  The troop.

9.  The retreat.

10. The tattoo.

11. To recall

detachments.

12. Drummer's call.

13. Come for orders:

First sergeants'

 call.

Sergeant's call.

Corporals' call.

14. The roll.

15. Double quick march.

16. Run.

17. Halt.

18. March in retreat.

19. commence firing.

 

 

The sounds are:

 

1.  The general.

2.  The assembly

3.  To the colour.

4.  Common time.

5.  Quick time.

6.  The reveille.

7.  The retreat.

8.  The tattoo.

9.  To recall

detachments.

10. Bugler's call.

11. Come for orders:

First sergeants'

 call.

Sergeant's call.

Corporals' call.

12. Double quick march.

13. Run.

14. Forward march.

15. Halt.

 


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INSTRUCTION FOR THE DRUM MAJOR

 

16. March in retreat.

17. Commence firing.

18. Cease firing.

19. March by the right

flank.

20. March by the left

flank.

21. Rally on the reserve.

22. Rally on the

battalion.

 

NOTES:  When the whole of the troops, in the same camp or garrison, are to depart, the general, the assembly, and to the colour, will be beaten or sounded, at the proper intervals, in the order here mentioned.  At the first, the troops will prepare for the movement; at the second, they will form by company, and at the third, unite by battalion.  If some of the regiments only are to depart, those beats or sounds will be preceded in each of these regiments, by the particular march of the regiment.

The roll is for cease firing.  The same beat continued, constitutes the long roll, which will only be given on a sudden appearance of the enemy, or other imminent danger.

For the application of the sounds and beats to the movements and firings of skirmishers, see the table at the end of Instruction for Light Infantry or Rifle, Volume II.

 

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INSTRUCTION FOR THE DRUM MAJOR

 

Signals of the drum-major (or chief musician) for the principal beats and sounds.

 

1.  The general.

Extend the right arm, seize the staff at the middle, and raise the pommel to the height of the chin.

2.  The assembly.

Extend the right arm, raise the staff about a foot from the ground, and place the thumb on the pommel.

3.  To the colour.

Raise the staff perpen-dicularly, the ferrule upwards, the arm ex-tended, and at the height of the shoulder.

4.  The long roll.

Put the staff on the right shoulder, the ferrule to the rear.

5.  Common time.

Raise the arm, turn the wrist within, and place the staff horizontally across the body at the height of the chin.

6.  Quick time.

Project the ferrule of the staff direct and hori-zontally to the front.

7.  Double-quick time.

The same signal, with a brisk agitation of the staff.

10. Run.

Raise the staff perpen-

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INSTRUCTION FOR THE DRUM MAJOR

 

 

dicularly, the ferrule down, the arm extended at the height of the shoulder.

12. The roll.

Raise the staff in the left hand in the manner of the last signal.

 

Signals for the movement of the field music

and band.

 

1st.  To march by the right flank, take the staff at the middle and extend the arm to the right.

2d.  To march by the left flank, make the same signal, extending the arm to the left.

3d.  To diminish front, let the ferrule fall into the left hand, held as high as the eyes.

4th.  To increase front, let the pommel of the staff fall into the left hand, held as high as the eyes.

5th. To change direction, turn half round to the drummers, and indicate to them, by a movement of the staff, to which side they are to wheel or turn.

6th.  To oblique to the right, extend the right arm as high the shoulder, holding the staff slantingly, and grasp the ferrule, the left hand as high as the hip.

7th.  To oblique to the left, make the contrary signal; the pommel of the staff will always indicate to which side the movement is to take place.

 

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INSTRUCTION FOR THE DRUM MAJOR

 

To ground drums, &c.

 

1.  To put up drumsticks.

Grasp the staff under the pommel, and raise it as high as the eyes, extending the arm to the front.

2.  To unsling drums.

Draw the pommel to the breast.

3.  To ground drums.

The same signal as for putting up  drumsticks.

1.  To take up drums.

2.  To suspend drums.

3.  To draw out drumsticks.

Make the same signals with the staff as for putting up drumsticks, for detaching drums, and for grounding drums.

 

 

Instructions for the Corporal of Pioneers.

 

 

The post of the pioneers, in line of battle, has been given, Title I.

In column in maneuvre, the pioneers will be on the reverse flank, abreast with the right centre company, except with the double column, when they will generally march in its rear.

In route marches, as also in the passing of defiles, to the front or rear, the pioneers will march six paces in front of the drummers.  In route marches, all pioneers of a general column (column of several battalions) may be assembled at its head.

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INSTRUCTION FOR THE DRUM MAJOR

 

Pioneers and drummers may be designated as markers, and used accordingly, in the maneuvres and evolutions. 


 

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